Riding to Höfn

Once again blogging in the morning instead of the evening. Yesterday’s ride to Höfn (fishing village on Southeastern part of Iceland) was our easiest ride so far. On Friday we rode 85 miles in order to only have to ride 41 on Saturday. Plus, we had lucked out and made a last-minute hotel reservation so we wanted to get to Höfn as early as our check-in time would allow. We wanted to make maximum use of the reservation!

We rolled into Höfn right at 3 pm and checked into our room. It has a beautiful ocean-facing view. First things first: unpack our tent so it could start to dry and then string a clothes line across the room to start drying clothes. I didn’t have anything dry left. The combination of rainy days and lots of sweat had moistened my wardrobe. Natalie doesn’t sweat as much (she is in better shape — added note from Natalie: haha yeah right) so she still had a few dry options…. We started unpacking and hanging things around the room. It soon looked like our luggage had exploded into the room – stuff everywhere!

Next we went to a supermarket and binge shopped. $100 dollars later we were laden with food for the next 2-3 days, although it seems like we’ve somehow managed to eat half of it in our hotel room over the last 12 hours. 🙂

On Thursday we had made friends with a nice family camping near us. On Friday as they passed us in their car they stopped and gave us their contact information in Höfn and invited us to do laundry at their home. As we were shopping I sent him a note saying that I still needed to look for a part for our bike and we’d be a little late. (Long tangent: when we arrived in Iceland I failed to tighten every bolt on our bike – rattling around in an airplane hold tends to loosen things up. In our second day, riding into the wind, we hadn’t noticed when a small part fell off our bike – an idler wheel – that helps maintain the chain line when we pedal hard – keeping our pedal force from being absorbed by our rear shock. Without the part some of the chain management is being provided by a chain tube and metal bracket which have tons of friction under pressure and will eventually destroy our chain. The idler is a specialized part – unlikely I could find one even in Salt Lake City, so no chance of finding one in Hofn. However, I hoped to find something that could make the situation a little better. The ride is hard enough without mechanical inefficiencies.)

Back to the story. Our friend Siggi said he’d meet us at our hotel and look at the bike with us. It turns out Siggi his the captain of a fishing boat and after looking at our problem he called his boat’s engineer to come help. After some brainstorming we rode to their boat and they improvised something that will work. Icelandic fishermen who are days and weeks at sea have to be able to repair anything on large complex ships – our bike was easy to them. The bike situation is now improved. Siggi drove us around town and then let us use his family’s washer and dryer. He then showed us some of the fishing industry infrastructure before dropping us off at our hotel. What an amazing blessing to have met such a kind and generous person.

We spent the rest of the evening in our hotel room eating food and enjoying the space, warmth, and dryness. It is amazing to have a bathroom 4 feet from our bed!

Natalie is going to add some thoughts…

Weather on the ride into Hofn was cloudy and cool but no rain! The winds were nice to us. There were occasional small climbs but nothing killer. We saw several cyclist packers, a few even pulling trailers like us! Kinda fun to see others experiencing what we are. Lots more beautiful scenery along the coast. Loving it. There was considerably less traffic! Yay!

It was so cool to have a private tour of Hofn from a sea captain (whose father and grandfather and so on were also fishermen), someone who has lived here his entire life! It was also fascinating to get a tour of his ship. I think he said it was built around 1960 and is the oldest fishing ship still in use in Hofn. We had a great visit with him too as we waited for our laundry, talking about fishing adventures (even when he stood – literally – on a killer whale that was trapped in a net next to their ship as they worked to free it), whales, language and education (he speaks great English), family and children, the increase in tourism here and how it has affected everything, the training required to be a sea captain, the fishing industry and related regulations and recent changes as the country works to protect its resources and stay sustainable, etc.

All in all a pretty amazing day and cool “add” to our adventure!

Beautiful finish after a long ride

Blogging first thing in the morning…. We were too tired last night.

We knew we were going to be riding into the wind and rain yesterday. We also knew that we had an extra long ride because there were only two places to stop: one at 45 miles which wouldn’t cover enough distance to get us into Hofn by Saturday night (and we have a one-night hotel reservation in Hofn that night) and the other near mile 85. We worked efficiently to eat and break camp in the morning and headed out around 9 AM.

It rained on us most of the day and the wind slowed us significantly. It wasn’t until between 3 and 4 PM that we made the midpoint. We ate at a gas station (the only one for 120 miles) and set off for another long ride. The winds shifted and we had side wind and tail wind which helped us make it to our destination before 9. So grateful for the favorable wind.

We arrived completely gassed at the place we thought we could stay. However, the campsite didn’t look like it was there. There was no road sign for it, which is strange for Iceland. However, our bike maps said there was one .3 miles down a hill. We were not feeling up to riding another 5 hours to get to the next campsite, so we rode down to the guesthouse to inquire. As we rode up we saw one tent with a bike near it. We asked inside and they said we could stay. I think they don’t advertise because they don’t want tent campers, but we were so grateful they let us set up a tent. We get to use their restaurant’s bathrooms and set up on their backyard.

Here are a few comments and observations from yesterday and the previous days:

  1. This year our bike plus gear is over 200 pounds. Hills hurt. Our last two days have had just over 1000 feet of climbing each day. Hopefully we’ll be in shape for next week’s climbs.
  2. Yesterday evening with let than 9 miles to go we saw many cars pulled over. We were moving at a good pace but decided to stop and see what everyone was looking at. We were so glad we stopped. It was a glacier lagoon and it was stunning.
  3. The horses here are beautiful. The have long manes. Some of their manes cover their faces. Many want to run with us as we ride by. (Sheep seem curious about us.)
  4. We’ve been eating at gas stations, but they are few and far between. Yesterday our only opportunity was at mile 45. We are thankful for fries and salad.
  5. The water here is amazing. The stuff that comes out of a bathroom sink is like expensive bottled water.
  6. We see a few other bikers each day, but not as many as we thought we would see. It is always nice to see someone else experiencing Iceland in the same way.
  7. We’ve had a few days of rain and are so grateful for our waterproof gear. Although after riding for 10 hours in the rain I’m soaked on the inside. It is probably sweat, but it might as well be rain. Almost all of my clothes are wet and haven’t had the chance to dry, so this morning I might be putting on wet clothes for today’s ride.
  8. Not to complain, but so far Iceland
    chocolate
    has been mediocre. Come for the water, not the chocolate.
  9. The traffic thus far had been rough. It’s like we are in a vehicular mosh pit of tourists. As we go east it is getting better. Each day we’ve been run off the road fewer times. Only twice yesterday. We are so grateful for drivers who slow down as they pass. We find that the closer we ride to the white line the more bold and dangerous drivers are when passing us – thinking there is room to pass without getting out of their lane.
  10. One way bridges are really common.
  11. We are sleeping great. Sleeping in a tent has been no problem. The only downside is all the extra gear you have to haul around.

Today we have a shorter ride and we are staying one night in a hotel (first for this trip). Hoping for a relaxing day.

Begin and end your day with a waterfall

After a hard long day yesterday, today was beautiful. Within view of our waterfall-of-the-moment, we ate breakfast (oatmeal and hot chocolate), packed up camp — talking to several other campers about our bike all morning (which turned out to be a theme for the day) — and got on our way. Dry weather and a tail wind much of the day! By a bit before lunch time the skies became blue and sunny. Ahhhhhh.

We did 67 miles today, so 10 miles shorter than yesterday. (But the wind being in our favor made the world of difference.) During the first third of the ride we had some brutal climbs, one that even forced us to get off the bike and push. Ugh, not fun. But we made it. Traffic was somewhat lighter than yesterday, which is nice, but still more than we’d like. It is nerve-wracking — for both us and I’m sure sometimes the drivers. We are riding as aware and as carefully as possible and we really appreciate the drivers who appear to be doing the same.

We had lunch at a small cafeteria-type diner in a gas station in a town called Vik. (We can remember the short names. Many Icelandic City names are so long!) Fries and salad for Natalie, veggie pita for Pete. We had several more conversations with other travelers from all over (as well as a few locals) about the bike! It draws a crowd. Pete is a great demonstrator. Natalie has had the chance to speak French with quite a few people already. Iceland is definitely tourist-filled.

Afternoon scenery: Some more waterfalls, amazing green and dark-brown cliffs, a very huge far-off glacier/mountain, cool lava rocks in various formations, beautiful farms, blue skies!

Tonight we are in a nice campground, again by an incredibly beautiful glacier-melt waterfall (as with our site last night) in a town called Kirkjubæjarklaustur. Wow, that’s a cool name. When we rode into town, with sore, tired bodies, we grabbed a few groceries, then headed to the community pool. They we enjoyed a shower, a swim, and a wonderful soak in the hot tub. Then to our campground to set up, eat backpacking chili, visit with a few fellow travelers, and get ready for bed. Feels great.

Long day

This is actually the day after our long day. We were too tired last night to write a blog entry.

We slept really well in our first campsite. It was nicely vacant, at least compared to what we’ve seen since.

We left Þorlákshöfn at about 10:30 headed toward Selfoss. It was raining but we knew we had to make up miles due to a route change the day before. Our riding was slow, and we didn’t make it to Selfoss until around noon. We found a great place to eat: Yellow. It had plenty of food that fit our diets. It was delicious, but expensive (but well worth it).

We left Selfoss and headed straight into the wind. This was our lot in life for the next 10 hours. In total we covered 77 miles in about 12 hours with a lunch and dinner break. It was completely draining. There was so much wind and rain and traffic — see below — that we couldn’t talk much.

We did have some spectacular scenery, despite the rain and headwind. Beautiful dark cliffs with lush greenery and cool waterfalls.

We found traffic to be much different than our first day. No shoulder and lots of cars zipping by fast. That really wears on our nerves. A couple times we had to ride off the road to make room. We are hoping that the further east we get the fewer cars we’ll see.

At about 8 pm we started looking for a hostel, guest house, or hotel. We thought it would feel good to sleep inside and dry off. No room in the inn, however. So we finally rolled into a campsite at 10:30. It was 11:30 before we were eating, but I was too chilled to eat. The beautiful waterfall we camped by made up for the discomfort.

Day 1

Monday and Tuesday melded together into a single day. Bryan dropped us off at the airport and we quickly made it through the Delta check-in process. Let’s just say there are a few extra steps when part of your luggage is a disassembled tandem bike.

True to form neither of us slept well on the airplane. This is crazy frustrating, as I can sleep like a baby in church. Maybe this is God’s way of reminding me not to sleep in church. We touched down in Iceland wired.

It took a bit of time to assemble the bike and get ourselves ready to ride, as expected. It was and still is a gorgeous day! Sunny, blue sky, nice tail wind! What a treat.

A local suggested a route change, which turned out nicely. It had one hill that pushed 10 percent grade for about a mile, but otherwise was flat. Beautiful lava rock landscapes and ocean views all along.

Staying in a campsite in Thorlakshofn (but with some cool Icelandic letters — the first letter looks kind of like a “P” for example).

That great idea I had about using a tarp for tent, and our bike for the poles… turns out it wasn’t such a great idea. Now I’m trying to figure out if it’s worth it to drag the tarp around for the next 3 weeks or just ditch it in a dumpster.

We are too tired to write much tonight but hope we will sleep well tonight, even though it is still middle of the day light outside at 10 pm. Sorry we can’t upload many pictures.

Staying married

Several years ago I was on the roof, doing whatever people do on roofs, and noticed the rain gutters were full of leaves and muck. So I decided to clean them out. Natalie was down below working on her own project, but because apparently it was too hard for me to go back down the ladder to get the garbage can myself, I asked her if she could wheel it over from the side of the house and position it below me – providing a place for me to throw the mess I was about to pull from the gutter. She stopped what she was doing and walked down the steps headed toward the side of the house. In the process she misjudged her footing and went to the ground in pain. With a voice filled with concern and compassion I said something like “yeah – that looks like it hurts – you still able to grab the can?” She hobbled over and retrieved the garbage can (although at an annoyingly slow pace.) Later that day Sam took her to the hospital and we found out she had a broken foot. This story provides my friends with never-ending fodder for jokes.

Last week Natalie began to suspect another fracture in her foot – this time it was the likely result of over-training (running). Learning my lesson from the experience above I used more concern and compassion as I said “yeah – that looks like it hurts – you still able to ride around Iceland?” Although there was a little hesitation in her voice, the answer was yes. She’s been hobbling around the house gingerly ever since.

Yesterday her doctor verified the fracture (stress fracture in the third metatarsal) but cleared her for the trip, providing she takes it easy on her foot. That means our 18-mile hike-a-bike pushing a 200-lbs recumbent (bike, gear, trailer) on a gravel road at mile 400 has given way to a much longer ride around that obstacle (probably a net add of 60 miles and a few thousand vertical feet and the elimination of our pioneer handcart trek experience). It also means she gets to ride on the luggage carts in the airport. But beyond that, we’re still on for the trip and we’re still married.

We leave for Iceland in 4 days.